Those Plucky Posties

This female postal delivery person is walking her route in the war torn London of 1940. Notice the bomb-damaged building on the left and what looks like a pile of rubble, or perhaps gravel for fixing the road, on the right. A wheel barrow is propped neatly against the wall in the background.

Beginning September 7, 1940, London was bombed during 56 of the next 57 days and nights, a rain of fire known as the Blitz. With a stiff upper lip, the British populace carried on, remarking on the bombardment as one would on the weather, saying whether or not a day was “very blitzy.”

While the post office did not welcome many women employees prior to World War II, the loss of male staffers to the armed forces opened many positions to women.

The advent of WWII also caused the U.S. Post Service to adjust its thinking about women delivering the mail. In 1944, Jeannette Lee became Chicago’s first female letter carrier, leading to today’s post office where women comprise 40% of the work force.

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